Hurkacz outlasts Sinner to win Miami Open title

Sports

MIAMI — Hubert Hurkacz of Poland won the biggest title of his career Sunday by beating 19-year-old Jannik Sinner of Italy 7-6 (4), 6-4 in the Miami Open final.

Hurkacz, 24, improved to 10-0 in Florida this year, including the Delray Beach title in January. Ranked 37th, he beat two top-10 opponents in the same tournament for the first time, and he is projected to climb to a career-high 16th in next week’s rankings.

Hurkacz was poised playing his first final in the top-level ATP series, the Masters 1000. In the first set, he raced to a 3-0 lead, briefly fell behind and then played a solid tiebreaker, closing it out by winning a 25-stroke rally.

Sinner, playing in just his third Masters 1000 tournament, wobbled serving at 6-5 in the first set and was broken at love. He lost his serve twice more to fall behind 4-0 in the second set.

Hurkacz returned well and broke four times as he became Poland’s first Masters 1000 champion.

The matchup in the final was a surprise even though Novak Djokovic, Rafael Nadal, Roger Federer and Dominic Thiem skipped the tournament. Among those failing to capitalize on their absences were top-seeded Daniil Medvedev, No. 2 Stefanos Tsitsipas, No. 3 Alexander Zverev and No. 4 Andrey Rublev.

Hurkacz eliminated Tsitsipas and Rublev.

No. 1-ranked Ash Barty won her second successive Miami title Saturday when Bianca Andreescu retired in the final because of a foot injury while trailing 6-3, 4-0.

Articles You May Like

Kyiv targeted by Russia in ‘symbolic’ attack before NATO summit as one killed and several injured in missile strikes
‘The number of victims is impossible to imagine’: Missile strike on Ukrainian shopping centre with 1,000 inside
All they will inherit is rubble – relentless Russian bombardment continues as they close on Lysychansk
US basketball star ‘keeping the faith’ as she appears in Russian court on drugs charges
California plans to send millions of ‘inflation relief’ payments of up to $1,050. Here’s what we know about whether other states will follow